81 Photos of a Ladybird

Animals, MyPhotography

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Olivia, expression through the lens…

P.S. Obviously some photographs are better than others, but none are edited – goes to show that you do not need to edit your photos for them to be beautiful!

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High Speed Photography

MyPhotography, Passion Project

Dear Bloggers / Photographers,

This week, I have been browsing the internet searching for different photography techniques and skills. There are the simple ones, such as ISO, aperture and exposure. And then there are the interesting, experimental techniques, such as infrared photography (specially manufactured camera/lens),  burst zoom photography (more in next post), HDR (underexposed, perfect and overexposed photos of same scene merged – not my thing), perspective (see previous posts), diffraction and starbursts (sort of done).

Slow shutter speed (when I get a tripod!), camera toss (I’d LOVE to try it! maybe soon…), smoke art photography (I’ll try to learn it!), light painting (tried with the moon in earlier post), time-lapse (interesting…) and high speed photography (which I have experimented with in this post!

It worked alright, however I will need to try again once I have a tripod, also, for my birthday, I will be receiving a photography kit that takes the photo when something happens, such as sound trigger, light trigger and more! This will work better as the timing will be more accurate. In the photos below, have a look at the splashes of water and the captures of the lemon falling to certain submersion!

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The lemon, cut!

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The lemon, before the inevitable fate of being chopped up and used in a photography experiment. Some examples of bokeh photography as well – light in the background has been blurred, creating bokeh! I took a few shots in different angles of the lemon to create different effects with the bokeh.

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Falling…

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Just skimmed the surface of the water…

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Full submersion! A thin wall of water barricading the lemon!

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Floating… rejuvenation!

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Droplets of water on the lens, as well as ripples from the splash!

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Cascading… towards the bowl.

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The imminent fall of a water droplet.

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Peaceful bowl.

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My hand about to release…

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More floating – has the lemon’s flesh tanned?

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SPLASH! Not quite a bellyflop, perfect capture of submersion.

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A zoomed out shot of lemon’s submersion, water droplets sprinkle the air.

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Release…

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The droplet… almost falling!

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Both halves collapsed from the fall…

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Whoops, autofocus focused on my thumb, not the lemons!

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Splash!

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I’m not really sure what autofocus was doing…

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This time it was on the bowl… next time!

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Bokeh water, because… yet again, the focus was wrong…

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Again, on the bowl… the lemon falling!

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Collision.

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Collision / submersion.

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Peace.

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SPLASH!

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Nearly there!

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Just…

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FOCUS!!!! I’m so angry with it! But it did create lovely bokeh!

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That’s better, I love this shot!

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Another pretty good one…

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A fleeting moment captured.

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I switched to a cup to create a more dynamic / prominent effect from the splash of water.

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The two experimental resources!

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SPLASH!

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The black bowl again…

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The reason I switched from the white bowl to a black one is because the black contrasts against the water, whereas the splash of water is harder to see and less prominent against a white bowl.

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A web of water…

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An overexposed shot, however, the splash of water is pleasing!

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I tried capturing a few shots of a tennis ball thrown into the pool! It creates a lovely rippled effect!

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This one is particularly interesting, the submersion of the ball made a tower of water and some beautiful ripples…

So, those photos were my experiments with high-speed photography. The trick is to set the shutter speed to the fastest the camera can go! My camera goes up to 1/4000, which is the setting I used!

What do you think?

Olivia, writing (and photographing) on a whim…

Perspective

Art, Create, Homework, MyPhotography, Passion Project, School, Writing

Dear Bloggers,

As in the last post, I learnt about perspective. So, what is perspective and how can I use it to enhance my photos?

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Photo Credit: Olivia Cejnar (me!)

Perspective Definition

Perspective can mean, in photography – from a personal view or a two dimensional illustration drawn to give the perspective of a 3D object.

What is perspective in photography?

Earth is 3 dimensional, but a photograph is 2 dimensional. When a 3D object is photographed, it is really a 2D depiction of a 3D object. Putting perspective into action in photographs can make an image much more interesting.

Perspective refers to the relationships between objects in a photograph, the distance, size and space etc. When the perspective is changed, it can, for the mind, change the shape, size and, overall the perspective of the scene.

Linear Perspective

The farther an object is from the viewer, the smaller it appears, also, when parallel lines meet at a distance this is called linear perspective. This is how the human brain judges distance. Linear perspective is affected by the distance from camera to the subject and the focal length of the lens.

Rectilinear Perspective

All lenses apart from some like fisheye lenses are rectilinear. This means they shoot the lines as they are (straight lines). A fish eye lens, however, produces a rounded perspective. For example, as shown:

Parallel lines in a photo gives the perspective that they will eventually meet at a far distance, this is called vanishing point. This is another example of perspective.

Height Perspective

When photographing a landscape scene where the foreground gradually rises toward the horizon, the viewer‘s mind reaches the conclusion that the higher up the base of an object is in the ground, the greater its height perspective. I have experimented with this whilst photographing trees.

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Photo Credit: Olivia Cejnar (me!)

Overlap Perspective 

When photographing a scene with different objects overlapping, the objects that are nearer to the camera overlap or obstruct the objects that are farther away. THis is obvious when viewing the photo. This partial obstruction or overlapping of various elements gives the viewer a sense of depth and perspective of the distance between objects in reality.

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Dwindling Size Perspective

In our mind we are aware of the sizes of most objects we are familiar with. Such as people, animals, trees etc. When photographing, this can be used. For example, in a scene with two people, if one appears twice the size of the other, the automatic expectation is for the viewer to think the bigger person was closer to the camera.

When shooting a landscape with a person or any known subject in it, the viewer will be able to guess the distance and the scale. The photographer can then establish a scale the viewer could use to compare the real size of various objects in the photograph.

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Photo Credit: Olivia Cejnar (me!)

Other simpler perspectives include bird’s eye view, side view, keystoned (from below). These are the perspectives I have used in my previous post’s photographs.

There are a few more, however, I won’t get into that today. After learning about this, I will try taking a few photos in more industrial areas!

Olivia, writing (and photographing) on a whim…

Bibliography:

http://www.school-of-digital-photography.com/2014/01/what-is-perspective-and-how-can-we-use-it-to-improve-the-composition-of-our-photographs.html

http://digital-photography-school.com/perspective-photography-dont-just-stand-move-feet/

http://www.picturecorrect.com/tips/perspective-in-photography/

http://photoinf.com/General/NAVY/Perspective.htm

Passion Project – Wk 4

Homework, MyPhotography, Passion Project, School

Dear Bloggers,

This week I have been experimenting with photographing the flowers my Mum received for Mother’s Day. Using my camera, I was experimenting more with ISO, aperture, exposure times, shutter speed and exposure brightness.

As you can see in the first few photos, I have adjusted the exposure and the aperture to change the effect of the colour saturation and tone. In the first photo, the exposure and aperture was set perfectly to have maximum brightness and good tone.

The second and fourth photos, however, were under exposed and came out too dark. The third photo came out quite yellow, neither under or overexposed, however I was not satisfied with the tone. This is why the first photo is the best.

I was also playing with the exposure brightness. The higher the exposure brightness, the brighter and more exposed this image will look. I changed it to 3 settings below the average to make the photos look less exposed.

Another aspect that I was focusing on this week was, in fact, lens focus (get it?). By turning the lens focus, the image can be more distinct and clearer in certain areas. For example, if I turned the wheel towards the right, subjects closer to the lens would be in focus. If the wheel was turned to the left, objects and landscapes further away from the lens would have been in focus. I often changed the setting to ‘Manual’ for the lens focus, so I could manually choose which object I wanted in focus.

For example, in a few of the photos above of the roses and the ferns, I have alternated between focusing on the rose and focusing on the fern by manually changing the focus. By changing the focus, it also changes what appears clearer in the background and the depth of field.This also sometimes gives a lovely, interesting effect because, if the frontal subjects are blurred and the focus is sorely on an object in the near distance, it can have an interesting effect, such as some of the photos above do.

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Lastly, I have been looking at perspective (get it?). The angle of the lens and the shot can give different perspectives. For example, in some photographs, I have angled the shot to be bird’s eye view. This gives the perspective of the bird, or of the viewer looking above the subject. I have also incorporated side view, which is one of my favourite angles in photography. The side view I find interesting because the subject is stark and focused from the side with a plain, blurred background that contrasts against the subject.

The perspective of the image can also make the photo look like an illusion. For example, if a person stands near a large building and the photo is shot closer to the person with the building in the background, the person can appear nearly as large as the building, which comes out like an illusion. Same goes for inanimate objects. If a bed of flowers is shot closer to the lens with a larger image in the background, it can appear larger than it truly would be in reality.

Geometric shapes shot at a particular perspective can also make the shapes look like an illusion. See more on this subject here: Perspective

So that’s what I have been doing this week! In the following post, I will be posting my poem and more information of this week’s investigations.

Olivia writing (and photographing) on a whim…

 

 

Passion Project – Wk 3

MyPhotography, Passion Project

Dear Bloggers,

Recently, I received a new Canon EOS 400D Digital SLR camera! In my latest post, I was explaining a few of the features of this camera and the lens I will be using. So over the past few days, I have been avidly photographing anything and everything I can lay the lens on.

From flowers, to animals, to a sickly yellow moon, I have been (perhaps overly) enthusiastic about this new camera and its open abilities. Even when I am experimenting with its capabilities (which are dramatically different from the small digital camera I owned prior) and making mistakes, I have managed to transform these mistakes into modest successes (if not masterpieces).

Saturday night in Sydney, the moon was an unusual yellow shade. So at 10.00PM that night, I ventured out, armed with the camera, a skimpy cream nightie exposing my skin to the unwelcoming and frigid night air. Since this was my first time with astrophotography, (let alone my first time holding a DLSR camera), I decided to begin with unplanned experiments.

Originally, my goal was to photograph a few clear images of the yellow moon, and perhaps a few photographs of the stars that seemed to be dappled across the universe. Easy! However, to master (for me grasp) the art of astrophotography proved difficult. Initially, I placed the mode to Manual, set the exposure to 10″ and off I went. However, to take crisp images at such a long exposure time was near impossible without a tripod. My photos came out blurred and trails of light were the result of my camera shake.

In order to reach my goal, I experimented with faster exposure times, ranging from 1/5 – 30″, attempting to discover the perfect exposure for the situation, settling with 8″. The photos remained blurry, as a result of the lack of any tripod. However, the trail of light began to catch my attention, and when I set my exposure time to 15″, the blurry trail transformed into ‘light patterns’.

From this, I gave up trying to take crisp moon photos and focused on making more patterns with the light. I realised this was the result of the movement of the camera, and, setting the exposure time to 8″, began to move the camera in patterns to make shapes with the light.

After doing this, I tried changing the aperture, where I discovered that the lower the f/stop number, the brighter the image. So I changed the aperture to F4.0. This setting allowed maximum light in making a brighter image. Later, I learned this is because the lower the number, the more light it lets in. This is why, in some photos, the image is whiter and brighter than prior photos. When I changed the aperture, the light transformed from a yellow light to a cleaner, platinum white.

At the time, I did not change the ISO, but have now learnt that changing it in darker scenes is agood idea. However, the higher the ISO, the noisier and grainier the image will be. I only dared experiment with ISO 100 to 400. So it turns out that a disappointing mistake has transformed into an unanticipated success! Experimenting with the exposure, ISO, aperture and shutter speed was definitely enjoyable and produced a promising result.

After this, and absorbing what I had learned about how I can adjust the settings to extract the most from the camera, I tried to take some crisp, clear photos of the oddly yellow moon and the stars (I am always amazed by them, they seem to be dappled among the infinite universe of blackness). As you can see, nearer to the end of my gallery, I have (barely) managed this, but have certainly improved from where I started! I have definitely learnt a lot in this one hour. You can see my (failed) attempts of star photos in the images that seem to be black. If you look close, you can just see a few patterned specks!

You can see my (failed) attempts of star photos in the images that seem to be black. If you look close, you can just see a few patterned specks! This probably failed because the photo would have only been clear if the exposure time was 30″. I was unable to access a tripod, and my shaky hands could not find a clear picture of the stars because of the camera shake. Next time!

Astrophotography will certainly be difficult to master ( in my case grasp), however, until I near it, playing around with settings will be fun! In the following post, I will be writing the poem to describe my favourite or most intriguing photo. Which do you find most interesting? Have you experimented with astrophotography before? Let me know!

Olivia, writing (and photographing) on a whim…

Canon Fired

Homework, MyPhotography, Passion Project, School

Dear Bloggers,

So this Friday evening, I was fortunate enough to be given a DSLR camera by my Dad! After weeks of wishing, dreaming, hoping for the fulfilling experience of using a manual camera. To listen intently to the ‘flickering heartbeat’ as the shutter snaps another memory. I have been dreaming of that beautifully blurred background and the stark, focused image of the subject.

Finally, at last! I now have a Canon EOS 400D Digital DSLR! Some of the features of this DSLR include:

  • 10.1 megapixels
  • Nine-point auto-focus
  • Continuous shooting burst (up to 27 shots JPEG / 10 shots RAW)
  • 2.5″ LCD monitor
  • 3 settings for long exposure noise reduction
  • Picture styles
  • Built in flash
  • Interchangeable lenses
  • From 1/4000 to 30 sec and bulb shutter speed
  • ISO 100 – 1600
  • Full aperture
  •  Exposure modes – program, shutter-priority, aperture-priority, auto depth-of-field, full auto, programmed modes, manual, autoflash
  • 510g body only
  • CF Card
  • Custom white balance
  • 12 picture modes
  • Good quality images

The lens I am using is a 24-105mm zoom lens. Over the past few days, I have been experimenting with the new features this camera offers. Since this is my first experience with a manual camera, I have been learning and reading about how to extract and gain all I can from it.

In the following post, I will be beginning to explain what I have learned about how to use a manual camera and what I have done to gain the most from each feature.

Olivia, writing (and photographing) on a whim…